Excerpts From Famous Love Letters: Zelda Sayre

Zelda Fitzgerald

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Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald  was born on July 24, 1900  and died on March 10, 1948.  She was born Zelda Sayre (Sayre: rhymes with fair) and grew up in Montgomery, Alabama. She was an American novelist in her own right and also the wife of famous writer F. Scott Fitzgerald.

An icon of the 1920s—she was dubbed by her husband as “the first American Flapper“. After the success of her husband’s first novel, This Side of Paradise (in 1920), the Fitzgeralds became celebrities.

The newspapers of New York considered them to be classic representations of the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties: young, (seemingly) wealthy, beautiful, and energetic.

Famous Love Letters: Zelda Sayre:

I am loving, loving every tiny minute of the day and night—

Scott–there’s nothing in all the world I want but you–and your precious love–All the materials things are nothing.

I’d just hate to live a sordid, colorless existence-because you’d soon love me less–and less–and I’d do anything–

anything–to keep your heart for my own–I don’t want to live–I want to love first, and live incidentally…

Don’t–don’t ever think of the things you can’t give me–You’ve trusted me with the dearest heart of all–and it’s so damn much more than anybody else in all the world has ever had—Don’t you think I was made for you? I feel like you had me ordered–and I was delivered to you–to be worn–I want you to wear me, like a watch–charm or a button hole bouquet–to the world.

And then, when we’re alone, I want to help–to know that you can’t do anything without me…

All my heart–

I love you

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: John Keats

John Keats, by William Hilton (died 1839). See...

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John Keats was born on Halloween, the 31st of  October in 1795 and died on the 23rd of February in 1821. He was an English Romantic poet. He joins Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron as important and influential contributors to the second generation of the Romantic movement.  Even though his work had only been in publication for  four years before his death.

From letters and poem drafts, it appears that Keats first met Frances (Fanny) Brawne between September and November in 1818. Keats writes to Brawne in one of his many hundreds of notes and letters: “My love has made me selfish. I cannot exist without you — I am forgetful of every thing but seeing you again — my Life seems to stop there — I see no further. You have absorb’d me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving — I should be exquisitely miserable without the hope of soon seeing you. […] I have been astonished that Men could die Martyrs for religion — I have shudder’d at it — I shudder no more — I could be martyr’d for my Religion — Love is my religion — I could die for that — I could die for you.” (Letter, 13 October 1819).

Keats’ poetry is defined by its sensual imagery, especially in the series of odes. Nowadays his letters and poems are some of the most analyzed and popular to be found in English literature. And no wonder, his writing is truly delightful and passionate!

Famous Love Letters: John Keats:

Sweetest Fanny,

You fear, sometimes, I do not love you so much as you wish?

My dear Girl I love you ever and ever and without reserve.

The more I have known you the more have I lov’d. In every way – even my jealousies have been agonies of Love, in the hottest fit I ever had I would have died for you.

You are always new. The last of your kisses was ever the sweetest; the last smile the brightest; the last movement the gracefullest.

When you pass’d my window home yesterday, I was fill’d with as much admiration as if I had then seen you for the first time. Even if you did not love me I could not help an entire devotion to you: how much more deeply then must I feel for you knowing you love me.

My Mind has been the most discontented and restless one that ever was put into a body too small for it.

I never felt my Mind repose upon anything with complete and undistracted enjoyment – upon no person but you.

When you are in the room my thoughts never fly out of window: you always concentrate my whole senses.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Franz Kafka

Austrian Writer Franz Kafka

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Franz Kafka was born July 3, 1883 and died June 3, 1924. He was a German novelist and was culturally influential . Contemporary critics and academics think Kafka was one of the finest authors of the 20th century. The term “Kafkaesque” has become part of the English language.

Kafka met a woman named Felice Bauer in 1912. She lived in Berlin and worked as a representative for a dictaphone company. For the next five years they corresponded often, met every now and again, and became engaged twice. Their relationship finally came to an end in 1917.

Starting in 1920, Kafka developed an intense relationship with Czech journalist and writer Milena Jesenská.

In July of 1923, during a vacation near the Baltic Sea, he met Dora Diamant and briefly moved to Berlin where he lived with her. She was a 25-year-old kindergarten teacher from an orthodox Jewish family, who was independent enough to have escaped her past in the ghetto. They became lovers, and she was influential regarding Kafka’s interest in the Talmud.

Famous love letters: Franz Kafka:

I belong to you; there is really no other way of expressing it, and that is not strong enough.

How could I, fool that I am, go on sitting in my office, or here at home, instead of leaping onto a train with my eyes shut and opening them only when I am with you?

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Juliette Drouet

Juliette Drouet (Noël)

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Julienne Josephine Gauvain AKA Juliette Drouet, was born on April 10, 1806  and diedMay 11, 1883. She was a French actress who abandoned her stage career after becoming the mistress of Victor Hugo. Juliette acted as a secretary and travelling companion to Hugo and accompanied him in his exile to the Channel Islands. She wrote literally thousands of letters to him over the course of her life.

Famous Love Letters: Juliette Drouet:

If only I were a clever woman, I could describe to you my gorgeous bird, how you unite in yourself the beauties of form, plumage, and song!

I would tell you that you are the greatest marvel of all ages, and I should only be speaking the simple truth. But to put all this into suitable words, my superb one, I should require a voice far more harmonious than that which is bestowed upon my species –

I will not tell you to what degree you are dazzling and to the birds of sweet song who, as you know, are none the less beautiful and appreciative.

I love you, I love you. My Victor; I can not reiterate it too often; I can never express it as much as I feel it.

I recognise you in all the beauty that surrounds me in form, in colour, in perfume, in harmonious sound: all of these mean you to me. You are superior to all. I see and admire – you are all!

You are not only the solar spectrum with the seven luminous colours, but the sun himself, that illumines, warms, and revivifies! This is what you are, and I am the lowly woman that adores you.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: James Joyce

James_Joyce_Sepia

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Famous Love Letters: James Joyce:

You are my only love.

You have me completely in your power.

I know and feel that if I am to write anything fine and noble in the future I shall do so only by listening at the doors of your heart.

I would like to go through life side by side with you, telling you more and more until we grew to be one being together until the hour should come for us to die.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo-Young

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Victor-Marie Hugo was born 26 February 1802  and died 22 May 1885. He was a French poet, visual artist, playwright, novelist, essayist, human rights activist, statesman and important exponent of the Romantic movement in France. He was the third illegitimate son of Sophie Trébuchet (1772–1821) and Joseph Léopold Sigisbert Hugo (1774–1828).  Against his mother’s wishes, young Victor fell in love and became secretly engaged to his childhood friend Adèle Foucher (1803–1868). He married Adèle (in 1822) only after his mother’s death in 1821.

Famous Love Letters: Victor Hugo:

My adorable and adored

I have been asking myself every moment if such happiness is not a dream.

It seems to me that what I feel is not of earth. I cannot yet comprehend this cloudless heaven.

My whole soul is yours.

My Adele, why is there no word for this but joy? Is it because there is no power in human speech to express such happiness?sometimes I tremble lest I should suddenly awaken from this dream divine.

Oh, now you are mine! At last you are mine! Soon — in a few months, perhaps, my angel will sleep in my arms, will awaken in my arms, will live there.

All your thoughts at all moments, all your looks will be for me; all my thoughts, all my moments, all my looks, will be for you!

Adieu, my angel, my beloved Adele! Adieu!

Still I am far from you, but I can dream of you.

Soon perhaps you will be at my side.

Adieu; pardon the delirium of your husband who embraces you, and who adores you, both for this life and another.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Author Nathaniel Hawthorne had close ties to A...

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Famous Love Letters: Nathaniel Hawthorne:

Dearest, – I wish I had the gift of making rhymes, for methinks there is poetry in my head and heart since I have been in love with you.

You are a Poem.

Of what sort, then? Epic?

Mercy on me, no! A sonnet?

No; for that is too labored and artificial.

You are a sort of sweet, simple, gay, pathetic ballad, which Nature is singing, sometimes with tears, sometimes with smiles, and sometimes with intermingled smiles and tears.