Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: John Keats

John Keats, by William Hilton (died 1839). See...

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John Keats was born on Halloween, the 31st of  October in 1795 and died on the 23rd of February in 1821. He was an English Romantic poet. He joins Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron as important and influential contributors to the second generation of the Romantic movement.  Even though his work had only been in publication for  four years before his death.

From letters and poem drafts, it appears that Keats first met Frances (Fanny) Brawne between September and November in 1818. Keats writes to Brawne in one of his many hundreds of notes and letters: “My love has made me selfish. I cannot exist without you — I am forgetful of every thing but seeing you again — my Life seems to stop there — I see no further. You have absorb’d me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving — I should be exquisitely miserable without the hope of soon seeing you. […] I have been astonished that Men could die Martyrs for religion — I have shudder’d at it — I shudder no more — I could be martyr’d for my Religion — Love is my religion — I could die for that — I could die for you.” (Letter, 13 October 1819).

Keats’ poetry is defined by its sensual imagery, especially in the series of odes. Nowadays his letters and poems are some of the most analyzed and popular to be found in English literature. And no wonder, his writing is truly delightful and passionate!

Famous Love Letters: John Keats:

Sweetest Fanny,

You fear, sometimes, I do not love you so much as you wish?

My dear Girl I love you ever and ever and without reserve.

The more I have known you the more have I lov’d. In every way – even my jealousies have been agonies of Love, in the hottest fit I ever had I would have died for you.

You are always new. The last of your kisses was ever the sweetest; the last smile the brightest; the last movement the gracefullest.

When you pass’d my window home yesterday, I was fill’d with as much admiration as if I had then seen you for the first time. Even if you did not love me I could not help an entire devotion to you: how much more deeply then must I feel for you knowing you love me.

My Mind has been the most discontented and restless one that ever was put into a body too small for it.

I never felt my Mind repose upon anything with complete and undistracted enjoyment – upon no person but you.

When you are in the room my thoughts never fly out of window: you always concentrate my whole senses.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: George Gordon Lord Byron

George Gordon, lord Byron (1788–1824).

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Famous Love Letters: George Gordon Lord Byron:

In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours–Amor mio–is comprised my existence here and hereafter.

I feel I exist here, and I feel I shall exist hereafter,–to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you,

But I more than love you, and cannot cease to love you.

Think of me, sometimes, when the Alps and ocean divide us,–but they never will, unless you wish it.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Gustave Flaubert

Gustave Flaubert

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Gustave Flaubert was born December 12, 1821  and died May 8, 1880) He was a French writer who is included among the greatest Western novelists of all time. He is known particularly for his first published novel in 1857, Madame Bovary. Flaubert was well known for his scrupulous devotion to his art and style.

Between 1846 and 1854, Flaubert had a romantic relationship with the poet Louise Colet; his letters to her still survive. He never married. His biographer Émile Faguet indicates that his affair with Louise Colet was his only serious romantic relationship.

Famous Love Letters: Gustave Flaubert:

I will cover you with love when next I see you, with caresses, with ecstasy.

When you are old, I want you to recall those few hours, I want your dry bones to quiver with joy when you think of them.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Lord Randolph Churchill

Randolph Churchill

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Famous Love Letters: Lord Randolph Churchill:

Dearest if you are as fond of me as I am of you…nothing human could keep us long apart.

This last week has seemed an eternity to me; Oh, I would give my soul for another of those days we had together not long ago…

My first and only love…Believe me ever to be

Yrs devotedly and lovingly,

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Lord Byron

Lord Byron

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Famous Love Letters: Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, later George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron,  commonly known simply as Lord Byron, was a British poet and a leading figure in Romanticism. Some of  Byron’s best-known works are the  poems She Walks in Beauty, When We Two Parted, and So, we’ll go no more a roving. He is thought to be one of the greatest British poets and remains widely read and influential.

Byron was celebrated in life for aristocratic excesses including huge debts, numerous love affairs, and self-imposed exile. He was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as “mad, bad and dangerous to know”.

Here are some quotes from his letters:

If all that I have said and done, and am still but too ready to say and do, have not sufficiently proved what my real feelings are and must be ever towards you, my love, I have no other proof to offer.

My Dearest & Most Beloved Friend

Bless you — ever & even more than ever.

Your most attached

Is there anything on earth or heaven would have made me so happy as to have made you mine long ago? and not less now than then, but more than ever at this time — you know I would with pleasure give up all here and all beyond the grave for you –

I was and am yours, freely and most entirely, to obey, to honour, love –and fly with you when, where, and how you yourself might and may determine.

November 16, 1814

My Heart –

We are thus far separated – but after all one mile is as bad as a thousand – which is a great consolation to one who must travel six hundred before he meets you again. If it will give you any satisfaction – I am as comfortless as a pilgrim with peas in his shoes – and as cold as Charity – Chastity or any other Virtue.

Lord Byron, English poet, to Annabella Milbanke, his future wife.

Love Note Ideas: Writing and Presentation

10 HIDDEN LOVE NOTE IDEAS:

1. Hide little romantic notes everywhere. In pockets, in wallets, in purses and in the glove box; in the fridge, under the keyboard, in the dryer and in the toolbox; in a book, in the newspaper, in a magazine and in the phone directory. Hunt around your home to discover unique hiding places. Some of your them might not be found for months! What fun! Need help with your romantic words of love? Check out How to Write Romantic Love Letters .

a-reader-moore 2. Tuck a love note or a romantic coupon in the book your sweetheart is reading.

3. Insert a note into a bottle and replace the cork. “Discover it” with your love on the beach (you may have to distract them with a kiss while you drop the bottle) or float it in your pond, pool or hot tub at home and let them find it.

4. Hide a note under your beloved’s pillow with explicit instructions detailing what you would like them to do to you… or perhaps what you would like to do to them

5. Conceal a small love note under your mate’s dinner plate, in the phone book, in the medicine cabinet, with the Xmas gift wrap, in their glasses case.

6. Hide a wee romantic love note in their wallet tucked in between the dollar bills.

7. Tuck a romantic note inside a folded towel, in the dry cleaning, in a tissue box, in their hat, in a CD case.

8. Cut colorful paper into heart shapes. Write romantic love messages on each one. Ask the clerk in a party store to insert each heart note into a balloon before they are inflated. Present the balloon bouquet to your sweetheart with a needle for a popping good time.

9. Tuck a romantic love note in a small plastic bottle and float it in the bath—under the bubbles!

10. Hide a heart shaped note in your sweetheart’s shoe that says, “You are my heart and soul” or “You are my Sole Mate!”

Say It With Romantic Love Quotes

Romantic love quotes can be used in all kinds of ways. As well as the more obvious applications like including them in correspondence such as romantic emails, romantic love letters and romantic cards, they can be used to create any number of romantic gifts for your Special Someone.

“Find some nice quotes and really turn up the heat in your romance today!”

If you have nice handwriting, or know someone who does (for you doctor-types out there- you know who you are…)

A tastefully framed love quotation is a thoughtful and romantic birthday gift idea for your loved one to put on their desk or hang in a special spot.

Just look around you and use your imagination. You’ll be surprised how easy it is to add romantic words to your gift giving.

Don’t be afraid to experiment! Your sweetheart will love you all the more for your literary sense of adventure!

romantic love quotes romantic art Alphonse Mucha

Here’s an idea for turning your romantic “scrawl” into a work of art! Use your word processor to print out what you have written (or copied) using a “calligraphic” font for a professional looking presentation. I think the personal touch of handwriting makes it a bit more meaningful and therefore romantic, but not if you cringe at your scribbling every time you see it!

Romantic sayings can be written on a photo of the two of you (or a nice one of just you) prior to framing. They can be added to a gift enclosure card or written on sticky notes and tucked here and there around the house.
Read more: http://www.romantic-ideas-online.com/romantic-love-quotes.html#ixzz1CqnIkHox