Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Juliette Drouet

Juliette Drouet (Noël)

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Julienne Josephine Gauvain AKA Juliette Drouet, was born on April 10, 1806  and diedMay 11, 1883. She was a French actress who abandoned her stage career after becoming the mistress of Victor Hugo. Juliette acted as a secretary and travelling companion to Hugo and accompanied him in his exile to the Channel Islands. She wrote literally thousands of letters to him over the course of her life.

Famous Love Letters: Juliette Drouet:

If only I were a clever woman, I could describe to you my gorgeous bird, how you unite in yourself the beauties of form, plumage, and song!

I would tell you that you are the greatest marvel of all ages, and I should only be speaking the simple truth. But to put all this into suitable words, my superb one, I should require a voice far more harmonious than that which is bestowed upon my species –

I will not tell you to what degree you are dazzling and to the birds of sweet song who, as you know, are none the less beautiful and appreciative.

I love you, I love you. My Victor; I can not reiterate it too often; I can never express it as much as I feel it.

I recognise you in all the beauty that surrounds me in form, in colour, in perfume, in harmonious sound: all of these mean you to me. You are superior to all. I see and admire – you are all!

You are not only the solar spectrum with the seven luminous colours, but the sun himself, that illumines, warms, and revivifies! This is what you are, and I am the lowly woman that adores you.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Author Nathaniel Hawthorne had close ties to A...

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Famous Love Letters: Nathaniel Hawthorne:

Dearest, – I wish I had the gift of making rhymes, for methinks there is poetry in my head and heart since I have been in love with you.

You are a Poem.

Of what sort, then? Epic?

Mercy on me, no! A sonnet?

No; for that is too labored and artificial.

You are a sort of sweet, simple, gay, pathetic ballad, which Nature is singing, sometimes with tears, sometimes with smiles, and sometimes with intermingled smiles and tears.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: George Gordon Lord Byron

George Gordon, lord Byron (1788–1824).

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Famous Love Letters: George Gordon Lord Byron:

In that word, beautiful in all languages, but most so in yours–Amor mio–is comprised my existence here and hereafter.

I feel I exist here, and I feel I shall exist hereafter,–to what purpose you will decide; my destiny rests with you,

But I more than love you, and cannot cease to love you.

Think of me, sometimes, when the Alps and ocean divide us,–but they never will, unless you wish it.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Gustave Flaubert

Gustave Flaubert

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Gustave Flaubert was born December 12, 1821  and died May 8, 1880) He was a French writer who is included among the greatest Western novelists of all time. He is known particularly for his first published novel in 1857, Madame Bovary. Flaubert was well known for his scrupulous devotion to his art and style.

Between 1846 and 1854, Flaubert had a romantic relationship with the poet Louise Colet; his letters to her still survive. He never married. His biographer Émile Faguet indicates that his affair with Louise Colet was his only serious romantic relationship.

Famous Love Letters: Gustave Flaubert:

I will cover you with love when next I see you, with caresses, with ecstasy.

When you are old, I want you to recall those few hours, I want your dry bones to quiver with joy when you think of them.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Kenneth Fearing

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Famous Love Letters: Kenneth Fearing

Kenneth Fearing: born July 28, 1902 – and died June 26, 1961.  He was an American novelist, poet and founding editor of the Partisan Review. Macha Rosenthal, literary critic said he was “the chief poet of the American Depression”.

Between the years of 1923-1928, Fearing had a romantic relationship with fellow writer Margery Latimer. In 1931, he met his future bride Rachel Meltzer. They were married on April 26, 1933. Their only child, poet Bruce Fearing, was born on July 19, 1935. Their marriage ended in 1942, largely due to Fearing’s growing alcoholic tendencies. They were granted a divorce in 1943. Kenneth married artist Nan Lurie on June 18, 1945. However, they separated in 1952.

In the 1920s and 1930s, he published regularly in The New Yorker and helped found The Partisan Review, while also working as an editor, journalist, and speechwriter and turning out a good deal of pulp fiction. Some of Fearing’s pulp fiction was soft-core pornography, often published under the pseudonym Kirk Wolff.

Herewith; some quotes!

Come back.

Because tonight you are in my hair and eyes,

And every street light that our taxi passes shows me you again, still you,

And because tonight all other nights are black, all other hours are cold and far away, and now, this minute, the stars are very near and bright

Come back. We will have a celebration to end all celebrations.

Excerpts from Famous Love Letters: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Browning

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Famous Love Letters: Elizabeth Barrett Browning:

You have touched me more profoundly than I thought even you could have touched me – my heart was full when you came here today.

Henceforward I am yours for everything.

And on

(10 January 1846)

Dear Robert Browning,

…Do you know, when you have told me to think of you, I have been feeling ashamed of thinking of you so much, of thinking of only you–which is too much, perhaps. Shall I tell you? It seems to me, to myself, that no man was ever before to any woman what you are to me–the fullness must be in proportion, you know, to the vacancy…and only I know what was behind–the long wilderness without the blossoming rose…and the capacity for happiness, like a black gaping hole, before this silver flooding. Is it wonderful that I should stand as in a dream, and disbelieve–not you–but my own fate?

Was ever any one taken suddenly from a lampless dungeon and placed upon the pinnacle of a mountain, without the head turning round and the heart turning faint, as mine do? And you love me more, you say? Shall I thank you or God? Both, indeed, and there is no possible return from me to either of you! I thank you as the unworthy may…and as we all thank God. How shall I ever prove what my heart is to you? How will you ever see it as I feel it?…

Excerpts From Famous Love Letters: Ludwig von Beethoven

Ludwig von Beethoven Romantic ArtFamous Love Letters: Ludwig von Beethoven:

My angel, my all, my very self

We shall surely see each other soon; moreover, today I cannot share with you the thoughts I have had during these last few days touching my own life –

If our hearts were always close together, I would have none of these.

My heart is full of so many things to say to you – ah – there are moments when I feel that speech amounts to nothing at all –Cheer up – remain my true, my only treasure, my all as I am yours.

Ah, wherever I am, there you are also –

Much as you love me – I love you more –

Oh God – so near! so far!

Is not our love truly a heavenly structure, and also as firm as the vault of heaven?

my thoughts go out to you, my Immortal Beloved, now and then joyfully, then sadly, waiting to learn whether or not fate will hear us –

I can live only wholly with you or not at all –

No one else can ever possess my heart – never – never –

Oh God, why must one be parted from one whom one so loves.

Be calm, only by a calm consideration of our existence can we achieve our purpose to live together –

Be calm – love me – today – yesterday – what tearful longings for you – you – you – my life – my all – farewell.

Oh continue to love me – never misjudge the most faithful heart of your beloved.

ever thine

ever mine

ever ours

Your faithful Ludwig